Completed Projects

  • Digital Records and Curation
    • The History of Queer Community Archives in California Since 1950 - San Jose Gateway PhD Program, dissertation
      PI: Diana Wakimoto.
       
    • New Challenges, New Solutions: How Government Agencies Can Effectively Manage Records Created Using New Social Media Tools

      PI: Dr. Patricia Franks

      Dr. Patricia Franks, an associate professor with the San Jose State University School of Information, examined use of social media tools by government agencies. Federal agencies are capitalizing on the popularity of social media to foster collaboration and citizen participation. While social media use offers clear benefits, there are associated risks, including privacy and security issues. Managers must identify records, determine what to do with material created by citizens, and use limited resources to manage increasingly limitless online content. Dr. Franks' report describes existing social media initiatives, explores why some agencies restrict use, and provides recommended best practices for managing social media records. Her report provides a framework for understanding records management issues in a Web 2.0 world for agency records managers, web masters, chief information officers, and social media offices.
      Read more about SJSU iSchool students who served as research assistants:

    • Public Records - Public Trust: Reclaiming History

      PI: Dr. Patricia Franks

      Dr. Patricia Franks, an associate professor with the San Jose State University School of Information, examined the challenges of safeguarding our nation's historical documents. She studied data regarding lost or stolen historical public documents, as well as reclaimed records, along with the laws enacted to address this issue. She developed a virtual exhibit presenting her findings, sharing knowledge regarding how to secure public records, how to reclaim missing records, and the legal aspects of this issue.

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  • Information Access and Use
    • Information Pathways: The Information Practices and Experiences of Teen Content Creators - San Jose Gateway PhD Program, dissertation
      PI: Mary Ann Harlan
       
    • Acquiring Search Expertise: Learning Experiences and Threshold Concepts - San Jose Gateway PhD Program, dissertation
      PI: Virginia Tucker
       
    • Online fantasy sports players' information needs and behaviors
      PI: Dr. Sandra Hirsh with Christine Anderson, Sportvision Creative Director

      Article:

      • Hirsh, S., Anderson, C., & Caselli, M. (2012). The reality of fantasy: Uncovering information-seeking behaviors and needs in online fantasy sports. CHI’12 Extended Abstracts on Human Factors in Computing Systems, 849–864.
         
    • Engaging a New Generation of Library Users: Exploring a Multi-Library Collaborative Model to Deliver Text Reference Service
      Sponsor: Institute of Museum and Library Services, 2010-2012
      PI: Dr. Lili Luo
       
    • Engaging a New Generation of Library Users: Exploring a Multi-Library Collaborative Model to Deliver Text Reference Service
      Sponsor: Institute of Museum and Library Services, 2010-2012
      PI: Dr. Lili Luo
      Dr. Lili Luo, an assistant professor with the San Jose State University School of Information, conducted the first in-depth research regarding how libraries can meet their patrons' information-seeking needs via text messaging. The research team is also studying how libraries and other information centers can collaboratively deliver services and expand their ability to meet patron needs during challenging economic times. Read more about the project and about SJSU iSchool student and research assistant Emily Weak.
       
    • Preparing Public Librarians to Support Health Literacy in their Communities
      Sponsor: CASA 2012-2013 Research Incentive Grant
      PI: Dr. Lili Luo
      Poor health literacy results in a range of serious consequences, including the inability to manage chronic conditions, obtain health services, and follow physician instructions. Nearly half of all adult Americans struggle with health literacy, making it a silent epidemic that leads to increased health care costs and poor health outcomes for millions of individuals. The public library is the first resource many people consult when seeking information on health topics, and librarians can play a vital role in improving health literacy. However, studies show that public librarians are not adequately prepared to address the health literacy needs of their communities. This study takes an interdisciplinary approach to addressing the health literacy needs of consumers, bringing together scholars and practitioners from Library and Information Science and Health Science to identify an effective mechanism for training public librarians to meet the health literacy needs of their communities.
       
    • VOYA’s YA Spaces of Your Dreams Collection

      PI: Dr. Anthony Bernier

      Dr. Anthony Bernier is Associate Professor at San José State University’s School of Information. This collection is the comprehensive assembly of every library YA space ever profiled in VOYA’s (Voice of Youth Advocates) pioneering and regular “YA Spaces of Your Dream” feature appearing in nearly every issue between 1999 and 2010. The forty-six YA spaces profiled contain detailed descriptions, photos, and commentary on small, medium, and large public and school libraries across the United States, including libraries with large as well as more modest budgets. Dr. Bernier’s nine-page introductory essay places the progressive and still-experimental nature of these spaces into the context of advocacy to advance professional YA LIS service. The introductory essay also begins to ground the topic of YA space in larger contexts by reporting on the survey of these existing library resources and empirically documents how this “spatial turn” produces outcomes that dramatically improve a range of library outcomes in institutions that take YA space equity seriously.

      Read more about SJSU iSchool students who served as research assistants:

    • Social Workers in the Library: A Unique Collaborative Model to Increase Access to Social Services

      PI: Dr. Lili Luo

      Dr. Lili Luo, an assistant professor with the San Jose State University School of Information, partnered with Dr. Peter Allen Lee, professor with the SJSU School of Social Work, to study how to help library patrons find the information they need regarding local social service resources. They examined a program provided by the San Jose Public Library, known as Social Workers in the Library. This unique collaboration between social work practitioners and information professionals seeks ways to increase access to social services programs and resources by reaching out to library patrons and providing consultation and information regarding local agencies and programs. Luo and Lee examined the efficacy of the program model and assessed additional opportunities to expand the program through new community partnerships, as well as new service delivery models.
       

    • Evergreen Project
      PI: Dr. Geoffrey Liu

      Article:

      • Liu, G. (2008). School libraries serving rural communities in China: The Evergreen model. School Libraries Worldwide, 14(1), 56-71.

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  • LIS Online Learning
    • Investigated distance learning scholarships and support to help Native Americans and Alaska Natives earn their MLIS degrees

      Lead iSchool Partner: Jane Fisher

      Americans and Alaska Natives earned their MLIS degrees. Read more about this research project here.
       

    • Preparing Tomorrow's Librarians to Serve Diverse Communities: An Interdisciplinary Partnership

      PI: Dr. Linda Main

      Faculty members from the San Jose State University School of Information and Department of World Languages and Literatures are developing, piloting, and evaluating a new 100% online Chinese language and culture course for students enrolled in the SJSU iSchool Master of Library and Information Science program. The project builds on two existing interdisciplinary language and culture courses in Spanish and French currently offered to SJSU iSchool students. The Chinese course will prepare future librarians to serve our nation's growing population of Chinese Americans, as well as our nation's growing interest in Chinese culture and the ability to participate in a global marketplace.
       

    • Preparing Librarians to Serve Diverse Communities Along our Nations Border

      Lead iSchool Partner: Jane Fisher

      The Serra Cooperative Library System, in partnership with the San Jose State University School of Information, is recruiting and educating a new generation of culturally competent librarians who will serve Californias two counties bordering Mexico. The project will address the challenges currently faced by Serra's 14 public library systems, as they seek to fill vacant librarian positions with individuals who enjoy serving the areas multicultural and multilingual population, who reflect the community's rich diversity, and who want to live and work locally. Future librarians will be recruited from the pool of paraprofessionals who already staff Serra libraries. They receive financial assistance and other support as they earn their MLIS degree and prepare to transition to professional positions. The entire Serra community benefits from local educational events that expand their understanding of how libraries can meet the needs of diverse populations. Read more about some of the Serra scholarship recipients.
       

    • Learning to Integrate Emerging Technology: Exploring the Impact and Efficacy of Learning 2.0 Programs in Libraries

      PI: Dr. Michael Stephens

      Dr. Michael Stephens, an assistant professor with the San Jose State University School of Information, is conducting research regarding the Learning 2.0 professional development program, offered by nearly 1,000 libraries worldwide. The self-paced, online program aims to educate library personnel about emerging technology, generate a willingness to explore and adapt to technological change, and gain new knowledge regarding how to use emerging technology to better serve their communities. Stephens is studying how this widespread professional development program is impacting library staff and library services, how the program model can be refined to improve long-term outcomes, and how it can inform further research regarding self-directed online professional development models.

    • Online Graduate Programs in Vietnam: A Model for Global Partnerships

      PI: Dr. Sandy Hirsh with Dr. Alice Hines and Debbie Faires

      Faculty members from the San Jose State University School of Information, the SJSU School of Social Work, and Vietnam National University (VNU) are partnering to examine the feasibility of transforming VNUs existing graduate programs in Library Science and Social Work to an online delivery model. The team is developing recommendations regarding the best approach to implementation, should VNU decide to move ahead. Adding online courses to VNUs existing face-to-face programs will enable the institution to meet a growing local demand for social workers and information professionals. SJSU iSchool is a recognized leader in online learning.

      Article:

      • Hirsh, S., Faires, D., & Hines, A. (in press). Perceptions and viability of launching LIS eLearning programs in developing countries: A Vietnam case study. In J.T. Du, Q. Zhu, & A. Koronios (Eds.), Library and Information Science Research in Asia-Oceania: Theory and Practice.
         
    • Librarians for Diverse Communities

      Lead iSchool Partner: Jane Fisher

      The Serra Cooperative Library System, in partnership with the San Jose State University School of Information, designed the Librarians for Diverse Communities project to recruit and educate culturally competent librarians to serve California's two counties bordering Mexico. The project addressed one of the challenges facing Serra's fourteen public library systems as they seek to fill vacant librarian positions with individuals who enjoy serving the area's multicultural and multilingual population, who reflect the community's rich diversity, and who want to live and work locally. This grant recruited 39 future librarians from the pool of paraprofessionals who already staff Serra libraries; 22 of whom were able to complete their MLIS degrees during the project lifetime. They received financial assistance and other support as they earned their MLIS degrees and prepared to transition to professional positions. The 3-year grant was awarded in Summer 2009 and was completed in Fall 2012. Read more about some of the Serra scholarship recipients. For more about the project, see http://www.librarysupport.net/serralib/

    • Collaborative learning in LIS online education
      PI: Dr. Geoffrey Liu

      Article:

      • Liu, G. (2012). Collaborative learning in LIS online education.
         
    • Unconventional success: the SJSU colloquium series
      PI: Dr. Anthony Bernier

      Article:

      • Bernier, A. (21 October 2008). Unconventional success: relevance, service, and technical savvy in the SJSU colloquium series. Internet Librarian Conference. Monterey, CA. p. 84-93.

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  • New Literacies and Learning
    • Community college faculty's teaching social networks and their implications for librarians - San Jose Gateway PhD Program, dissertation
      PI: Tina Inzerilla
       
    • Librarians as disciplinary discourse mediators
      PI: Dr. Michelle Simmons

      Article:

      • Simmons, M. H. (2005). Librarians as disciplinary discourse mediators: Using genre theory to move toward critical information literacy. portal: Libraries and the Academy, 5(3), 297-311. (Named the Ilene F. Rockman Instruction Publication of the Year and one of the LIRT Top 20 Instruction Articles by the ACRL Library Instruction Round Table) 
         
    • CAVAL Project
      PI: Dr. Michael Stephens, 2009 CAVAL Visiting Scholar in Australia

      Articles:

      • Stephens, M., & Cheetham, W. (2011). "The impact and effect of learning 2.0 programs in Australian academic libraries." New Review of Academic Librarianship, 17(1), 31-63.
      • Stephens, M. & Cheetham, W. (2012). "Benefits and results of Learning 2.0: a case study of CityLibrariesLearning --discover*play*connect." Australian Library Journal, 61(1), 6-15.
      • Stephens, M. & Cheetham, W. (2012). "The Impact and effect of Learning 2.0 Programs in Australian public libraries." Evidence Based Library and Information Practice, 7(1).

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  • Management and Leadership
    • Factors Influencing Funding Decisions by Elected Politicians at the State/Provincial Level: A Case Study of Public Libraries in Canada - San Jose Gateway PhD Program, dissertation
      PI: Cheryl Stenstrom
       
    • Operational relationships between municipal administration and public libraries: The case of information technology
      Sponsor: Canadian Urban Libraries Council
      PI: Stenstrom, C., Roberts, K. and & Haycock, K.
       
      Public library services are becoming increasingly dependent on technology. Most current public library strategic plans contain initiatives that can only be successful through the use of new technologies. There currently exist a number of models for operational responsibility of the IT infrastructure that public libraries require, including: a combination of City owned and operated assets and library owned and operated assets, City owned and operated assets that support all aspects of a library system’s services and strategic priorities, and City or library owned and operated assets combined with outsourced services that support services and priorities. Anecdotal evidence suggests that as municipal responsibility of IT infrastructure increases, public library strategic priorities that rely on technology become harder to meet. No empirical evidence exists to support or to reject such an assumption. Where such mergers have already occurred, there exists no evidence that might help determine if current agreements or arrangements can be improved. The main question this study will seek to answer is: Which organizational models best support public library IT technology-related goals? A secondary question is: Which models represent the best financial models while still providing support for library IT technology-related goals?
       
      Article:
      • Stenstrom, C., Roberts, K. and & Haycock, K. (2014). The role of influence in city and public library partnerships: An exploratory study. Library Management 35(3), forthcoming.
         

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  • Social Dynamics of Information
    • Depoliticizing the California State Library: James Gillis’s Political and Professional Transformation, 1899˗1917. (An article for a special issue of Information and Culture on state libraries)
      PI: Dr. Debra Hansen

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  • Technological Innovation and Change
    • Mannequins and Avatars: Bridging the Clinical Skills Gap with Innovative Nursing Simulations

      Lead iSchool Partner: Dr. Jeremy Kemp

      Dr. Jeremy Kemp, a lecturer with the San Jose State University School of Information, partnered with faculty from the SJSU School of Nursing to investigate new ways to create engaging and realistic learning experiences for nursing students through the use of virtual world simulations. The team explored how to integrate 3D virtual world simulations into clinical skills lab. They constructed a 3D model of an acute healthcare setting, allowing nursing students to interact with virtual patients and other healthcare providers in computer-based simulations that mimic real-life clinical scenarios. They evaluated how use of simulation technology can enhance student learning.
       

    • The Catalyst Project: A New Model for Library Residency Programs

      Sponsor: Institute of Museum and Library Services
      PI: Dr. Sandy Hirsh

      Leaders from the School of Information at San José State University, along with other national partners, developed a unique post-MLIS residency model, with emerging technology integration as a focal point of the residencies. A white paper published in June 2012 describes the residency model.  The project ended in August 2012.

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