International Experience Requirement

(Effective for students entering in Spring 2015 or later)

Our graduates should be leaders who will be cognizant of and sensitive to the requirements of changing realities in the international community.

Strategic Direction 2.3 of the School of Information Strategic plan is to:

          Promote internationalization in courses through content, assignments, and internships.

As part of this it is important that graduates:

  • Demonstrate the ability to consider issues from a global perspective
  • Show the ability to apply international standards and practices within the discipline or professional area
  • Demonstrate an appreciation of the relationship between the chosen field of study and professional traditions elsewhere.
  • Demonstrate appreciation of the diversity of language and culture.

There are two ways to accomplish this:

          Real mobility: when students travel abroad for placements or for full programs of study.

          Virtual mobility: experienced through online experiences. Virtual mobility can be defined as the  use of information and communication technologies (ICT) to obtain the same benefits as one  would have with physical mobility but without the need to travel.

Effective for students entering from Spring 2015 the School of Information online students will demonstrate in their culminating e-portfolio that they meet the international requirement through Core Competency (Program Learning Outcome) O (see below) by means of virtual mobility. There is no requirement to physically travel.

Competency O (for students entering the School of Information from Spring 2015-)

Students entering the School of Information from Spring 2015 onwards will address Comp O in their e-portfolio as outlined below. They will not provide a separate statement of professional philosophy.

Statement of Competency O: Identify ways in which information professionals can contribute to the cultural, economic, educational, and social well-being of our global communities

Comp O has two parts: The explication and the evidence sections.

In the explication section, students need to do the following:

  1. Articulate your understanding of what it means to contribute to the cultural, economic, educational, and social well-being of our global communities. Be sure to show that you can do the following:
    • demonstrate the ability to consider issues from a global perspective
    • show the ability to apply international standards and practices within the discipline or professional area
    • demonstrate an appreciation of the relationship between the chosen field of study and professional traditions elsewhere
    • demonstrate appreciation of the diversity of language and culture

In the evidence section, students need to do the following:

  • Provide one or more artifacts that serve as evidence to demonstrate the ability to do the following:
    • demonstrate the ability to consider issues from a global perspective
    • show the ability to apply international standards and practices within the discipline or professional area
    • demonstrate an appreciation of the relationship between the chosen field of study and professional traditions elsewhere
    • demonstrate appreciation of the diversity of language and culture
  • For each artifact, build a convincing argument that contains the following two parts:
    • a description of the context and content of the artifact
    • an argument in which you specifically explain how this artifact proves you are competent in this area.

Evidence can be provided in a variety of ways:

Example Coursework

You do not have to take a full class to meet the competency. You can meet it with one or two assignments that focus on a global perspective.
Many classes will contain some of the following components as part of the class:

  • The use and analysis of international case studies
  • Study of professional practice in other nations or cultures
  • Linked assignments (taking an existing assignment and linking it to a new outcome with an international or intercultural dimension)

All content in the following classes is relevant (but it is not necessary to take one of these classes to meet the requirement–individual assignments in other classes can be used for evidence):

International and Comparative Librarianship

An appreciation and understanding of how library development and practice reflect the cultural, economic, educational, political, social and technological development of nations and regions.

Intercultural Communication

Identify and solve cultural differences so essential for navigating a flat world. This course is designed to give students very practical tools to understand the worldview and experiences of others. They will learn about the differences between individual and collective cultures, why saving face can be more important than being right, how power is distributed differently between groups, and how various people rely on certain values for avoiding or dealing with conflict.

Examination of Global Library Issues Using Project Based Learning

This course will use the experiential pedagogy of project-based learning to examine select issues affecting global libraries within a specific community context of Librarians Without Borders (LWB). Project-based learning (PBL) is a pedagogical approach that challenges students to learn through engagement in a real problem. It simultaneously develops both problem solving strategies and disciplinary knowledge base and skills by placing students in the active role of problem-solvers confronted with an authentic, ill-structured situation that simulates the kind of problems they are likely to face as future managers in library/information organizations. Through investigation and collaboration, students work in teams to formulate questions, design investigations, collect and analyze data, make products and share their solutions and ideas.

Globalization and Information

Provides an overview of the influence of globalization on the generation,organization, access, transfer and use of information. Examines issues of globalization within the context of an information society, particularly on political, economic, technological and socio-cultural issues.

Crisis/Disaster Health Informatics

This course explores the interconnectedness of information, people, and technologies in a crisis/disaster (e.g. hurricanes, earthquakes, pandemics) and the intersecting trajectories of social, technical and information perspectives in crises/disasters. In particular, it examines how information is generated, accessed, organized, coordinated, and disseminated during a crisis/disaster. The course also examines the multiple roles that information professionals and libraries can play in crisis/disaster preparedness and response.

 

 

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