Student Showcase

Students enrolled in INFO 282 Emerging Future: Technology Issues and Trends seminar offered in spring 2017 and 2016 by Dr. Sue Alman gained skills to plan strategically for the changing technological landscape. The course design enabled them to participate in forecasting activities through readings, video presentations, guest lectures, introductions to today’s futurists, and individual research. After an historical overview of forecasting students became immersed in the:

  • literature and practices of current technological futurists and emerging technologies
  • strategic planning techniques for the changing technological landscape
  • grant-seeking process to fund new technologies
  • creation of a multi-media/infographic that focuses on a new technological area that can impact the future

Projects developed by students in the course are showcased here to provide you with a glimpse into some of the technologies that will impact our emerging future. We invite you to review the creations.

SHOWCASE 2017

Marygrace Barasi

Marygrace Barasi

Marygrace Barasi is working towards her MLIS degree and is expected to graduate in the Spring of 2018.  She volunteers as a tech mentor at the San Jose Public Library. And her studies at SJSU’s School of Information have only reaffirmed for her that libraries are one of the best things in the world.

Cybersecurity: Navigating the dangers of cyberspace: This infographic illustrates that cybersecurity has become a fact of our digital life as it also addresses the need for strong protective measures and standards. From large corporations’ data centers to a person’s mobile phone, we are heavily dependent on technology and we are all vulnerable to cyber hacks. It’s become imperative that we incorporate and take measures to secure our data.

Matthew Chase

Matthew Chase is the circulation manager at an academic library in Southern California. With several years of experience working in public and academic libraries, he is expected to graduate with a MLIS at San Jose State University in December 2017. He also holds an MA in Sociological Practice from California State University, San Marcos. His research interests include the emerging roles of librarianship in social justice, mass media representations of monsters, the development of digital folklore, and public discourses in the digital borderlands.

Inevitable Futures of Connectivity: A Comparative Book Review: This essay critically examines Kevin Kelly's The Inevitable: Understanding the 12 Technological Forces that will Shape Our Future and Parag Khanna's Connectography: Mapping the Future Global Civilization. While Kelly addresses the major forces spurring digital change for the next several decades and how we can shape emerging technologies, Khanna delves into the forces that will prompt collaboration among political and economic powers in a globalized society. Although Kelly and Khanna each have very distinct professional backgrounds and their work is grounded in different methodologies, the authors nonetheless share a common underlying goal: connectivity. This central theme of connectivity allows for a blended application of their insights. The authors convey signficant implications for the information professions, opening a key role in directing the future of an increasingly borderless and interconnected information culture.

It's the End of Libraryland as We Know It (and I Feel Fine): This multimedia presentation explores the possible futures of the Singularity and how libraries can dynamically interact with them. While there are many postulated definitions for the phenomenon, the Singularity essentially refers to a future period in which technological advancement is so rapid that human existence will be readically and irreversibly transformed. The inherent uncertainty of the Singularity raises critical discussion among proponents and critics of when and how this transformation may impact human life as we understand it. It also introduces visions of libraries in a post-Singularity future through cyborg librarians, library commonwealths, and emergence of deep information literacy. The presentation shows how libraries are already working toward the Singularity in theory and practice in the way of maker spaces, citizen science, and early adoption of virtual reality and robotic technologies.

Bridget Esqueda

Bridget Esqueda

Bridget Esqueda is a library paraprofessional at the Maricopa County Library District in Arizona. Her dream is to provide community based, inclusive, and innovative programming and services to her library. With over ten years of working in public libraries, she has gained perspective and knowledge in community service and knows that libraries have a long way to go. Her passions are traveling, eating delicious food, and spreading the love of libraries everywhere she goes.

Blended Reality: This presentation discusses what blended reality is and how it can affect us in the future. From work to school, blended reality could be part of our daily lives by integrating technology to our personal lives as well as career. I also discuss the pros and cons of having blended reality and what the future holds.

Debra Gilbert

Debra Gilbert

I am currently the branch manager of the M. R. Dye Public Library in Horn Lake, MS. I previously worked for over 13 years at the Richard Wright Branch Library of the Jackson- Hinds Library System in Jackson, MS. Before becoming a manager, I worked a few years as a youth services assistant and enjoyed inspiring the children of the community and helping them discover the joy of reading. As far as education, I received a Bachelor of Science degree in Business Administration from Alcorn State University in Lorman, MS. I love reading and anything involving the library. I look forward to receiving my MLIS degree from San Jose State University.

Intelligent Virtual Assistant: This Prezi presentation begins with the definition of an Intelligent Virtual Assistant (IVA) and discusses the breakthrough that allows this new type of technology to exist. This technology brought about significant advancements for companies like Google, Apple, and Nuance. The first video demonstrates the experience a customer has with virtual assistant Nina, created by the Nuance company. The future of IVA’s includes hands- free technology for businesses such as hospitals, warehouses, laboratories, and production plants. The next video showcases IBM technology involving IVA’s for traveling companions in your car. Although the technology continues to improve, much work is needed, and many challenges exist. The future of this technology in the library setting is promising. IVA’s may be used in several ways in the library, such as, making recommendations to the patrons and keeping a log of books read.

Paula Greene

Paula Greene

I am an IT professoinal working in web systems development for over ten years. I spent my formative years as a library assistant in special and public libraries and have always had a love for libraries and admiration for the work done by librarians. I am an alumnus of the iSchool at Syracuse University where I did my Bachelors in Information Management and Technology, and I am happy years later to be a part of another forward thinking iSchool here at San Jose University completing my MLIS.

Libraries of the Future? Staff-less Libraries: This presentation is an investigation into the new thrust towards staff-less and open libraries where users interact with facilities and collections without the obvious presence of librarians on the premises. It looks at the advantages and disadvantages of the model, and the opinions and concerns shared by stakeholders about loss of jobs, security issues, human interaction and communication issues, and the use of technology to manage these libraries.

Robin Guy

I am the assistant librarian at the Little Silver Library where I continue to utilize my teaching and business experience by working with the young adult population afterschool and maintaining the library website, Facebook page, and eNewsletter. My professional philosophy is that I wish to instill in patrons that learning is a lifelong process that should naturally follow their curiosity – that education is not the same as learning. I want to impart to them that the library will always be relevant because at its core it is a place of diversity, community and learning. That my role as a librarian is not to be an expert, but rather to be a guide and continue to learn along with you. Learning about technology and trends I feel is imperative to maintain relevance and understanding in order to connect with patrons. I hold a BS from Monmouth University and MS from NJIT.

Wearables: A Brief History: A Prezi presentation on the main types of wearables, a brief history of wearables, and what the future may bring. As technology becomes more embedded in our daily lives, wearables will continue to become commonplace expanding from smart watches and fitness trackers and into our homes, medical facilities and clothing.

Helen Keremedjiev

Helen Keremedjiev

When not having adventures in the outdoors, Helen Keremedjiev enjoys working for a federal library while attending school. She plans on graduating in May 2018 with a focus on user-experience librarianship.

Deep-Space Exploration: Future Impacts of Robotic and Human Missions: Humans landing on Mars is a real possibility in our lifetime, yet what are the advantages and disadvantages of funding deep-space explorations involving robots and humans? Although predicting emerging technologies and future trends is difficult, I foresee three overlapping outcomes of deep-space exploration. They are a greater technological collaboration between the public and private sectors; advancements in technologies with artificial intelligence and biometrics; and an increase of international diplomacy concerning extraterrestrial sovereignty.

Rachel Monahan

Rachel Monahan

Rachel Monahan received a bachelor's degree in English Literature at Saint Xavier University and spent her years as an undergrad working at her university library.  Her professional interests are mainly in academic librarianship and special collections.

Emerging Technology in Hacktivism: This infographic was made using Prezi and is about the emerging future and technology of digital activism specifically hacktivism.  I also give a brief overview of cyberactivism along with hacktivism and the main groups that are associated with hacktivism.

Howard Martin

Howard Martin

Howard Martin is a staff member in the MIT Libraries, and an MLIS student in the iSchool at SJSU. He is particularly interested in the potential accessibility benefits and problems of emerging technologies. When he is not working in or thinking about libraries, he is probably dissecting pop culture with his wife or playing improvised music.

Superintelligence or The Technological Singularity: A Critical Review: This review examines Nick Bostrom's Superintelligence: Paths, Dangers, and Strategies and Murray Shanahan's The Technological Singularity with a focus on their starkly different attitudes toward humanity. Throughout his introduction to a potential technological similarity, Shanahan marvels at the complexity of biological brains and bodies, while Bostrom quickly enumerates the ways in which machine processing power can quickly outstrip that of the human brain. Bostrom may err too far on the side of skepticism with regard to individual humanity, but he convincingly advocates for international coalitions as one of the best safeguards against potential rogue machine superintelligence(s). Differences in focus and tone aside, both books offer the reader a solid introduction to the field of machine superintelligence.

Machine Learning and OA Repositories: This inforgraphic offers a brief overview of the potential roles for machine learning and deep learning in exploring the content of Open Access repositories. It pays particular attention to the potential for machine learning to reinforce existing biases and power imbalances in scholarly publishing or to examine previously ignored scholars and lines of thinking.

Pamela Nicolas

Pamela Nicolas is in her last year of the SJSU MLIS program. She resides in Oceanside, CA and is aspiring to become an academic librarian. During her free time, she enjoys going to Disneyland and journaling about her adventures.

History of Foresight/Futures Studies and Methods to Plan for the Future: This LibGuide was created to show the history of foresight/future studies and share the methods to plan for the future. With all of the exponential technological growth, it’s helpful to layout what the possibilities are in the world of libraries and librarianship.

Kristen Rasczyk

Kristen Rasczyk

Kristen Rasczyk is a Library Associate at the Rutherford Public Library in New Jersey where she dabbles in everything from circulation and computer assistance to PR and social media to collection development. She is scheduled to complete her MLIS degree in Spring 2018.

Comparative Book Review: Contagious & Inevitable: Jonah Berger's Contagious: Why Things Catch On is an examination of why and how some things catch on and others do not. Through interesting and thought-provoking anecdotes, Berger illustrates not only how, but also why some ideas or products go viral. Kevin Kelly's The Inevitable: Understanding the 12 Technological Forces That Will Shape Our Future examines the ways in which technology will inevitably shape our future; it is not a question of if, but when and how. In this review, I look at each book separately and then consider them in relation to each other, how the ideas from a marketing standpoint can inform and influence the development of new technology.

Beacon Technology in Libraries: The majority of people who walk into the library today will have a smartphone with them. In fact, according to the Pew Research Center, 77% of all U.S. adults own a smartphone. This number rises to 88% for adults ages 30-49 and 92% of adults ages 18-29. In a 2015 study, Pew Research Center found that 73% of all teens had or had access to a smartphone. We can only expect these numbers to rise. Libraries can begin to use this to their advantage by adopting beacon technology to communicate information directly to users' smartphones. The objective of this presentation is to introduce beacon technology and explore the ways in which public libraries can use it to promote library collection and services, increase user interaction with these collections and services, and enhance user' overall experience at the library.

Chad Stephenson

Chad Stephenson

Chad Stephenson is currently a reference librarian for City College of San Francisco. He has worked in libraries for over 20 years, beginning as a volunteer at the San Francisco Public Library and then into serve at corporate, public, high school, and elementary libraries throughout San Francisco. He was the past president of BAISL (Bay Area Independent School Libraries), has been published in Teacher-Librarian journal, has built and overseen implementation of two school library facilities and programs from scratch, and helped to create one of the first learning commons for elementary/middle-schools on the West Coast. He currently is focused on serving the English Language Learner community of San Francisco through the community college library and developing tools, materials, and programs to better support their needs as adult learners.

History of Foresight/Futures Studies and Methods to Plan for the Future: Foresight and Future Studies has its roots in the US military going back over 100 years. It consists of visioning multiple scenarios of the future based on developed methodologies of forecasting. Several large think tanks, such as the Rand Corporation, have their roots in the military and have developed branches out from there to include technology, global, and societal planning, also know as "futuring." Today, futurists can be found globally and their techniques are pervasive in many industries--marketing, technology, and medicine, to name a few. New groups of futurists now gather in these fields to help businesses, cities, and technologies strategize about growth and development.

Megan York

Megan York is an i.School Open Classes student and looks forward to enrolling in the SJSU Masters in Library and Information Science program in the fall. Megan resides in Portland, Maine where she is the Administrative Manager for Patron Services at the Garbrecht Law Library at the Maine School of Law.

LibGuide: History of Foresight/Futures Studies and Methods to Plan for the Future This LibGuide is a compilation of information and resources on the history of Future
Studies and methods that can be used for planning for the future, as well as people to watch.

Internet of Things (IoT) for the Home of the Future: A Cautious but Optimistic Review

Seungyeon Yang-Peace

Sue Yang-Peace

Hello, my name is Sue and I reside in Las Vegas, NV with my husband, daughter, cat and 2 fish. I am currently a Youth Services Assistant for the Las Vegas Clark County Library District. If I’m not working full time, I’m busy doing school work or volunteering at my daughter’s school. It’s been a long road to the library world and I’m so grateful to be here! Getting my M.L.I.S. has been an incredibly rewarding experience and I hope to apply everything I have learned to better serve the patrons of my community.

Wearables: Today, Tomorrow, and the Future: Impacting every facet of our lives, Wearables may become an integral part of how we live and what we do. In this infographic, I explain what Wearables are, how we use them, and how we may use them in the future. I also explore the social ramifications of Wearables and the environmental impact of Wearables.

SHOWCASE 2016

Alyssa Bennett

Alyssa Bennett

Alyssa Bennett resides in Bend, Oregon. She is an adult services community librarian at Deschutes Public Library. She will complete her MLIS from San Jose State University in December 2016. She holds a Masters in American History from American University and an undergraduate degree from University of California, Santa Cruz.

What if…we lived in smart cities: Smart cities utilize innovative information and communication technology (ICT) to foster a new urban environment that enriches the lives of its citizens through decreased waste and increased efficiency. This Spicynode infographic discusses smart city trends including issues related to privacy, security, and the role of libraries in smart cities.

The History of Futuring: Futuring is a field of study that utilizes a variety of methodologies, tools, and techniques for envisioning and steering society toward a preferred future. This LibGuide shares information and resources for understanding futuring terms, methodologies and strategies.

Julie Cervantes

I am the director of the Belen Public Library & Harvey House Museum in the tiny oasis of Belen, New Mexico. I love how libraries elevate the communities they serve, and I feel immensely privileged to be a librarian (and a student at SJSU, too)!

How the libraries of the future can save the planet: This presentation examines the great promise that libraries hold for current and future generations, and ways that libraries may help facilitate an improved environment and society.

Sarah Kaminski

Sarah Kaminski

Sarah Kaminski graduated with a BME in 2010. She works at a public library as a circulation assistant and tech services worker. She has been studying for her MLIS since 2014.

Gene Editing: This short presentation gives a quick overview of the concept, history and major players in the field of Gene Editing. Also addressed briefly in this presentation are the benefits and cons of the field of Gene Editing.

Amy Little

Amy Little

I am a full-time student in the SJSU MLIS program who is scheduled to graduate in Fall, 2016. When I am not studying I work as a Library Technology Assistant at Belle Cooledge Library in Sacramento and a Grant Consultant for the Veterans Connect @ the Library initiative. The issue of technological access and the role of public libraries in bridging the digital divide is one of the reasons I chose to pursue a career in library work.

Digital Inequity: The digital divide has been an increasingly important issue since its emergence in the 1990s. A lack of access to the internet and reliable technological tools is measured alongside socioeconomic characteristics such as income, gender, race, education, and location. Disparities in these areas contribute to digital inequity across the United States. Efforts to bridge the digital divide are being made in the private and public sector. Public and academic libraries have long stood at the heart of these efforts. By providing access, training, and support libraries are able to serve as digital gateways for their communities.

Catherine Lockmiller

Catherine Lockmiller

Catherine Lockmiller is a graduate student in the iSchool program at SJSU, where she focuses on emerging technology trends and methodologies for converging new tech with traditional library services. She also studies queer theory, and the queering of library space as a tool for generating safe, friendly spaces for various subcultures. She is a Library IT Specialist at South Mountain Community College Library, and has taught courses in Ethics and Literature.

Rethinking real: Libraries and virtual reality. Virtual reatlity is an imminent technology that will reshape the way people interact with virtual, undefined space. If libraries can recognize this growing trend, we can be at the fore when it comes to providing context for the way people form information communities in virtual spaces.

Megan Mizuno

Megan Mizuno

I attended University of California, Irvine for undergrad and graduated with a BA in English. I currently reside in Modesto, CA and work for the Stanislaus County public library. My career goal is to become a youth services librarian.

The Future of Transportation: This digital poster provides an insight to certain aspects of the future of transportation. It includes a few factoids about the current status of autonomous vehicles around the world; information about the future of infrastructure, safety, sustainability, and the fate of human-operated vehicles; the possibility of innovating beyond road-restricted vehicles; and three common misconceptions/truths about autonomous vehicles.

Caitlin Morais

Caitlin Morais

I am the editor of GISLounge.com and Geolounge.com and a cartographer. I hold both bachelor's and master's degrees in geography from UCLA. I’ve spent the last fifteen years pulling apart geographic data and reassembling it in order to find relationships between different entities as a cartographer. During this time, I have had frequent contact with map librarians which has piqued my interest in the field of library information science. I am currently working on my MLIS from SJSU and volunteering in the Special Archives at Santa Clara University.

Futuring (not to be confused with Futurism, an art movement) is also referred to as future studies, futurology, foresight, and forecasting, just to name a few variations. This interdisciplinary field seeks to use a systematic, pattern-based understanding of the past and present in order to make better decisions in the present by understanding future possibilities. The modern iteration of this discipline is over one hundred years ago and many methodologies for engaging in forecasting have developed over the years. This LibGuide is divided into sections covering the history of future studies and the methodologies used by futurists for planning.

Drones and rapid geographic data acquisition: Emerging drone technologies hold great promise as a way to rapidly and accurately acquire geographic information. As opposed to satellite and airplane-based imagery acquisition, the preparation time and costs are far lower with drone technology. Drones can potentially be outfitted with a range of camera and sensor equipment and launched to rapidly acquire geographic data which can then be used in for emergency management response, agriculture, conservation management, just to name a few examples. This infographic takes a look at current experiments with data acquisition and the benefits and concerns of using drone technology.

Jennifer Overaa

Jennifer Overaa

Jennifer Overaa graduated with honors from Oregon State University, receiving a BS in Business Administration. She also holds a JD from University of California, Hastings College of the Law and has been a member of the California State Bar since 1993. She practiced law for more than a decade in the fields of construction litigation, business litigation, and high tech transactional work. Ms. Overaa is a current MLIS candidate at San Jose State University with an interest in public, academic, and legal librarianship, and currently works part time as a reference librarian at the San Anselmo Public Library.

The Future of Health Care: This infographic examines potential future developments in health care, including the impact of advances in nanotechnologies, disability assistance, and potential for life extension.

What is a Futurist: This LibGuide is created for public library use and is meant to be an introduction to the concept of futuring with links to sources on the history of futuring and essential methods and resources used to explore future technologies.

Roberta Richter

Roberta Richter

My name is Roberta Richter. I have been a student at San Jose State University since January of 2015. I currently work at the La Grange Park Public Library District as the Circulation/Technical Services Director. I have been at this library for nearly 4 years and have worked in public libraries for 14 years. I was fortunate to take the INFO282 course covering Emerging Technologies for the Spring2016 semester. This course is not something that I normally would have taken, but I decided to step out of my comfort zone and I am glad I did. I learned so much about different technologies that I have never heard about before. I hope to continue using the Flipboard from this course to read about more new and exciting things to come!

The Future of Social Media: This infographic discusses social media in its current state, including statistics regarding popular platforms. It also discusses predictions of change in social media, including social media being mainly mobile, the web getting smarter as time passes, how social media will change the government, and how companies will adopt open source attitudes toward social media. Some highlights discusses include how social media is and will be utilized in the work place, the down side of social media, challenges seen by companies using social media, the trend toward using social media to build positive psychology, and trends that are occurring in social media.

Rachel Riter

Rachel Riter

Hello everyone! My name is Rachel Riter. I am originally from Gilbert, Arizona, but currently I am living in Salt Lake City, Utah. This summer I’ll be heading into my third semester apart of this program. I’m on track to graduate this December. I currently work as a student librarian at the J. Willard Marriott Library on the University of Utah campus. I want to become an academic librarian.

Virtual Reality in Elementary Education: This infographic explores the use of virtual reality in elementary education. While virtual reality is still an emgerging technology there has already been development in its pedagogy and incorporation into classrooms.